Cannabis Seizures Have Increased 75% at Canadian Border

Cannabis seizures by the U.S. Border Patrol have increased by 75% since Canada’s adult-use legalization of cannabis took effect in 2018.

Full story after the jump.

According to U.S. Customs and Border Protection figures, there has been a 75 percent increase in cannabis seizures at the border between the U.S. and Canada, the CBC reports. Between November 1, 2018 and October 31, 2019 American authorities seized about 4,881 pounds of cannabis at the border, compared to 2,776 pounds over the same period in the year prior.

The number of individual seizures recorded jumped from 3,139 in the year prior to legalization in Canada to 3,917 post-legalization.

CPB spokesman Kris Grogan called the increase “an uptick” more than a massive spike. He noted that the number of U.S. enforcement actions for cannabis seizures decreased slightly after Canada’s national cannabis law reforms.

“Although the CBP recognizes an increase in marijuana seizures and incidents, seizures and incidents normally vary from year to year.” – Grogan to the CBC

Individuals who attempt to bring cannabis products or paraphernalia into the U.S. are subject to seizures, fines, or arrest, and non-citizens caught trying to bring cannabis into the U.S. are usually denied entry into the country.

Jacqueline Callin, spokeswoman for the Canada Border Services Agency, said that the agency does not allow THC or CBD products to be brought into the nation despite the legal status of both products in Canada.

“Canadian laws around travelling with cannabis remain clear and simple: Don’t take it in and don’t take it out,” she said in the report. “It remains illegal to bring cannabis and cannabis products in any form, including edibles and any oils containing THC or cannabidiol, across Canada’s national borders whether you are entering or leaving Canada.”

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