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Michigan Dispensary Licensing Deadline Now Being Enforced

Legal protection that was afforded for much of fall 2018 has ended after a judge dismissed the final cannabis licensing lawsuit against the state.

Full story after the jump.

A December 31 deadline for the shutdown of unlicensed Michigan medical cannabis dispensaries is now expected to be enforced following the dismissal of a final lawsuit, according to The Detroit Free Press.

Several previous deadlines from earlier in 2018 were ruled by a state judge to be unenforceable due to pending lawsuits. On Friday, however, Court of Claims Judge Stephen Borrello dismissed the final case against the state over the licensing requirements.

Unlicensed medical cannabis dispensaries are no longer protected and, if they continue to operate, will jeopardize their future possibility of receiving a license.

“It is very important for temporarily operating applicants to understand that any operation after Monday may be considered an impediment to licensure.” — David Harns, Michigan Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs spokesperson, via Detroit Free Press

The number of unlicensed businesses operating in the cannabis space in Michigan has fallen from about 215 in September to 72 as of the judge’s ruling — by now, most businesses have received a license, were officially denied, or have ceased operations. Many of the remaining 72 are either awaiting a regulatory decision or are missing parts of their application.

No matter the reason, however, the remaining businesses are now expected to shut down until they receive a license or jeopardize any chance at receiving a license in the future.

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