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South Carolina Medical Cannabis Legislation Formally Introduced

The legislation would place medical cannabis control in the hands of physicians — at least one medical group, however, opposes the legislation.

Full story after the jump.

Two Republican state Senators in South Carolina have introduced the Compassionate Care Act to the state legislature, according to a WIS News report.

The Act would allow doctors to prescribe medical cannabis to patients for an approved list of conditions. Sen. Tom Davis (R-Beaufort) told reporters during a press conference that South Carolina’s proposal would create the most socially-conservative medical cannabis legislation in the nation. “Each step of the process – from the growing to the processing to the dispensing is monitored in real time constantly,” he said.

The shortlist of potential approved conditions includes: cancer, multiple sclerosis, a neurological disease, PTSD, glaucoma, Crohn’s disease, sickle cell anemia, ulcerative colitis, wasting syndrome, severe nausea for a person who is in hospice care, chronic medical conditions causing severe muscle spasms — including multiple sclerosis — or “chronic or debilitating diseases for which an opioid is currently or could be prescribed by a physician based on generally accepted standards of care.”

The bill requires physicians who wish to issue medical cannabis endorsements to complete special training. Under the proposal, cannabis smoking would be banned and the only allowed delivery methods would be vaporized flower or extract, gel caps, suppositories, patches, edibles, or a topical cream.

The South Carolina Medical Association opposes the legislation. They issued the following statement: “Improving the health of South Carolina remains our top priority and legalizing marijuana will not do that.”

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