Mark Fischer

Oregon Congressmen Introduce Interstate Cannabis Commerce Bill

Federal lawmakers from Oregon have introduced legislation to allow the state’s recently passed interstate cannabis commerce legislation to move forward; part of said state law requires federal permission before cannabis products can start shipping across state borders.

Full story after the jump.

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden (D-Oregon) and Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Oregon) have introduced legislation that, if approved, would allow Oregon to move forward with its plan to export cannabis to border states with legalized use.

The State Cannabis Commerce Act would expand the ban on federal interference on cannabis programs – which have been approved in various forms through budget agreements since 2014.

In a release announcing the bill’s introduction, Wyden called on the federal government to “end its senseless and out of touch prohibition” of cannabis, while emphasizing that the current “gap between state and federal laws will only grow more confusing for both legal businesses and consumers” as more states legalize.

“As we fight for that ultimate goal, however, Congress can and should immediately act to protect the will of Oregonians and voters in other states from federal interference – and that should include interstate cannabis commerce.” – Wyden, in a press release

Earlier this year, the Oregon Congressmen introduced a package of bills to end federal cannabis prohibition and tax and regulate cannabis products. Last week, the House passed a Blumenauer-sponsored amendment to protect state-approved cannabis programs from federal interference.

“This week, we are turning to a top priority for Oregonians – allowing for interstate sale of cannabis,” Blumenauer said in a statement. “It’s past time we protect the states, like Oregon, that have gotten it right.”

Oregon’s recently-approved cannabis export law requires federal approval before a company can send a product to another state – namely Washington state, California, or Nevada. The measure follows a report earlier this year by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission that found the state has six-and-a-half years of cannabis oversupply based on current demand.

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