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Acabada ProActiveWear

Startup Announces Line of CBD-Infused Sportswear

Is this new CBD-infused sportswear line from Acabada a real breakthrough in activewear apparel, or is the extraordinary hype surrounding CBD leading startups down increasingly bizarre paths?

Full story after the jump.

You’ve seen CBD-infused foods and beverages, dog treats, transdermal patches, toothpaste, and maybe even sunscreen, but have you ever seen CBD-infused clothing — specifically, sportswear? A new CBD-infused activewear line from New York-based Acabada is going all-in on the CBD trend using high-tech transdermal technology.

According to a press release, company leaders were inspired by the many top athletes who have endorsed CBD as part of their training and post-workout ritual.

“While typical CBD products such as tinctures and edibles are growing exponentially in popularity, we began to envision a product that addressed health and wellness through a different lens. By physically infusing CBD into our garments, our product lives at the intersection of fashion, fitness, and wellness.” — Acabada CEO and Co-Founder Seth Baum, in the release

The clothes utilize a process called microencapsulation — which has been used to infuse garments with other ingredients such as aloe vera or antioxidants — wherein microscopic droplets of hemp-derived CBD molecules are infused into high-performance fabrics. The CBD is infused with a protective coating, which supposedly keeps the cannabinoids available over dozens of uses. According to the company, each article of clothing can withstand up to 40 high-intensity wear and wash cycles, after which users can upcycle their garments through the company for a 30% discount on their next Acabada purchase.

Prices break down at $120 for sports bras and tank tops, $160 for leggings, and $250 for jackets and one-piece jumpsuits.

There remain many unknowns, however, such as whether or not the CBD would withstand months to years of sitting in your closet, or if the CBD is activated by heat, friction, or sweat — or all three.

Robert Carson, a Vanderbilt University pediatric neurologist who studies CBD, said the clothes’ delivery method, at least, is well-proven. “My first feeling is this is crazy,” Carson told The Cut. “But, in actually thinking about it, and it kind of pains me to say it, this could be plausible.”

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