Dr. Bronner’s Donates $1M to Oregon Medical Psilocybin Campaign

The Dr. Bronners soap company announced it has contributed $1 million to the psilocybin therapy legalization campaign in Oregon.

Full story after the jump.

Dr. Bronner’s has donated $1 million to the campaign to legalize psilocybin therapy in Oregon. The cash infusion, first reported by Double Blind Magazine, was announced last week by David Bronner, CEO of the Dr. Bronners brand, during a Reddit AMA (Ask Me Anything).

Oregon’s Initiative Petition 34 aims to legalize the therapeutic use of psilocybin, which is touted by many activists as the next step in progressive drug policy reform. Psilocybin is in the final stages of studies for FDA approval as therapy for treatment-resistant depression.

“My family’s no stranger to severe depression and anxiety. Pharma drugs and traditional therapies are often inadequate, and psilocybin therapy has shown remarkable promise in clinical trials at John Hopkins, NYU, and other universities, for depression and end-of-life anxiety. FDA has recently designated the therapy “breakthrough” status, and we want to see this therapy available for those who most need it. But also for all adults struggling with the dilemmas of life, this therapy is incredibly helpful.” — David Bronner, CEO of Dr. Bronner’s

The initiative currently has just over 130,000 signatures but will require 145,000 before it can be approved for November’s ballot. If approved, IP34 would establish a state framework for medical access to psilocybin, which is a Schedule I drug under federal law.

Specifically, the proposal would create a patient screening process as well as centers for distribution and administration which would all be overseen by the Oregon Health Authority. The state would create research-based programs to handle everything from spore to patient, including cultivating the mushrooms, overseeing the training for facilitators, and administration of the medicines.

When asked why he was supporting the medical initiative as opposed to a decriminalization-focused campaign, Bronner said that the measure wouldn’t rely on “exorbitant taxes beyond what’s needed to cover the program,” so it should be “relatively affordable versus otherwise.”

“Definitely programs sponsoring the most indigent and marginalized and traumatized communities should be developed and we’re actively looking at this with other donors,” Bronner said.

Editor’s note: A previous version of this article incorrectly listed the Yes On IP34 campaign as a part of the Decriminalize Nature advocacy group.

Get daily news insights in your inbox. Subscribe

End


Latest Cannabis News

View all news