Paige Bollman

VT Hemp Proposal Increases THC Levels; Adopts CBD Grade System

The proposed rules would increase allowed THC content to 1% and create a system for classifying hemp crops based on their CBD quantity.

Full story after the jump.

Vermont’s Department of Agriculture has released draft rules for industrial hemp cultivation in the state which includes a THC threshold of 1 percent and a grade system for CBD products.

Dan Change, the co-founder of CBD laboratory Kria Botanicals, told VT Digger that the threshold of 1 percent – higher than the federal definition of 0.3 percent – means “all hemp genetics will be legal” under state law. Under the current regime, all hemp grown in the state must contain no less than three-tenths of 1 percent or it must be destroyed.

The proposed regulations’ rating scale includes:

AA, for products with CBD concentration more than 14 percent;

A, with CBD concentration between 12 and 14 percent;

B, for products with a CBD concentration 10 to 12 percent;

C, with CBD concentration between 8 to 10 percent.

Products with less than 8 percent would be considered biomass, and the concentration analysis must be confirmed by a certified lab.

The document notes there will be licensing fees but does not lay out a schedule. Currently, hemp farmers pay just $25 for a license to cultivate hemp but those fees are expected to increase dramatically for non-hobby and large-scale farms. Last month agriculture officials outlined a plan to charge between $500 and $3,000 per year for hemp licenses depending on acreage. The plan would also impose fees on processors and additional fees for indoor producers.

The agency plans to hold two or three public comment periods before deciding on adopting the rules.

Get daily news insights in your inbox. Subscribe

End


From Our Partners