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Jeff Turner

The campaign to allow social cannabis use in Denver, Colorado failed to get the required signatures for the proposal to appear on November ballots, according to an Associated Press report. However, a second proposal to allow cannabis use at some bars and restaurants is still awaiting word whether or not it will be put to voters in the general election.

The failed question would have asked voters whether to allow for 21-and-over cannabis clubs.

The current Colorado law does not outright ban public use. Instead, public use bans are a patchwork of local policies, according to the report. There are no cannabis clubs in other states with recreational-use cannabis laws; lawmakers in Alaska, however, are considering regulations to allow consumption where cannabis is sold, but that proposed system is not currently in place.

The Responsible Use Denver initiative, backed by Denver NORML, needed 4,726 signatures to qualify for inclusion on November ballots. The campaign submitted more than 7,500 signatures, but just 2,987 were verified as eligible by the Denver Elections Division, the Denver Post reports.

The review of the signatures for the Neighborhood-Supported Cannabis Consumption Initiative should be completed by next week. Backers of that campaign submitted more than 10,800 signatures, leaving them a bit more room for error. Under their plan, cannabis consumption would be “subject to regulation in a manner similar to alcohol,” with only non-smokable methods permitted. The pilot program would sunset by 2020 unless extended by the City Council or another voter initiative.

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